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Findings of the Court of Inquiry: And Reiews of the Judge-Advocate-General and of the General of the Army, in the Case of Major-General G. K. Warren Forgotten Books

Findings of the Court of Inquiry: And Reiews of the Judge-Advocate-General and of the General of the Army, in the Case of Major-General G. K. Warren

Forgotten Books

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331295570
Paperback
68 pages
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Excerpt from Findings of the Court of Inquiry: And Reiews of the Judge-Advocate-General and of the General of the Army, in the Case of Major-General G. K. WarrenThe court, after mature deliberation on the evidence adduced, and in accordance with theMoreExcerpt from Findings of the Court of Inquiry: And Reiews of the Judge-Advocate-General and of the General of the Army, in the Case of Major-General G. K. WarrenThe court, after mature deliberation on the evidence adduced, and in accordance with the requirements of the order convening it, submits the following as its report of the facts and its opinion in the case of Lieut. Col. G. K. Warren, United States Corps of Engineers, as regards his conduct as Major-General United States Volunteers, commanding the Fifth Army Corps at the battle of Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865, and as regards the operations of his command on that day and the day previous, so far as relates to his, Lieutenant-Colonel Warrens, conduct, or to the imputations and accusations against him.Report.The First Imputation is found in an extract from General Grants report, on page 1137 of the report of the Honorable Secretary of War to the first session of the Thirty-ninth Congress, as follows (see, also, Record, page 48):On the morning of the 31st, General Warren reported favorably to getting possession of the White Oak road, and was directed to do so. To accomplish this, he moved with one division instead of his whole corps, which was attacked by the enemy in superior force and driven back on the second division before it had time to form, and it in turn forced back upon the third division- when the enemy was checked. A division of the Second Corps was immediately sent to his support, the enemy driven back with heavy loss, and possession of the White Oak road gained.The facts on this point appear from the evidence to be the following: At 7:30 p. m., on March 30, 1865, General Meade, then commanding the Army of the Potomac, telegraphed to Lieutenant-General Grant as follows:Lt. Genl Grant:I send dispatch just received from Warren- line working badly. I think his suggestion the best thing we can do under existing circumstances - that is, let Humphreys relieve Griffin & let Warren move on to the White Oak road & endeavor to turn enemys right - as I understand Warren - Ayres is now between S. & W. Dabneys, liable to be isolated he must either be supported or withdrawn- by adopting the proposed plan he will be supported by the whole of the 5th Corps. & they ought to overawe any opposition the enemy can make, except from their entrenchments.The Roman numbers attached to this and the other dispatches, herein quoted, are the same that these dispatches bear in the four series of dispatches beginning at page 1239, where, attached to each, will be found the evidence of its receipt and correctness as a copy. - L. L. L., Recorder.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.